STD Test Results

Unlike many other STD testing options, our goal is to provide the fastest and most accurate test results so you can be sure of your status.

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Convenience and confidentiality.

To ensure no one has access to your results but you, your results are made available through a secure login unique to your order. Results are updated 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and typically will only take 24-72 hours to process. If you would prefer to call, simply contact a care counselor for a complete consultation on your test results. Nothing will ever be mailed to your home or healthcare provider. We are in compliance with all state and federal regulations governing the reporting of positive test results to ensure you are not contacted in the event of a reactive test. Your protected health information (PHI) is protected by HIPAA to ensure your information is kept private.

You will receive an email notification when your final results are available, however partial results can be accessed by logging in to the patient portal included in your order confirmation email. We do not store any PHI on our public website.

Early detection tests can take up to 5 business days to process as they are specialty send-offs. If you test positive for HIV, Syphilis, Hepatitis B or C, confirmatory tests are run free of charge, which will take additional time to process.

Medically reviewed by Hilary Davidson, Medical Writer
Reviewed on November 1, 2019

How to Read Your Results

The frequency with which people should get tested depends on your sexual activity and the specific STD/STI. As recommended by the CDC, HIV testing is recommended at least once for people between the ages of 13 and 64. Women should be tested every year for chlamydia and gonorrhea if they are 25 years old or younger and should continue testing if they have new, multiple or high-risk sexual partners. The CDC recommends specific testing for pregnant women and sexually active gay or bisexual men such as HIV and syphilis testing. Finally, HIV tested should be a yearly priority for individuals who use unsafe or shared needles.

The value column is used for STD tests that use a range of numerical values to describe whether the test is positive or negative. Range is shown with either the greater than [ > ] or less than [ < ] symbols. This number represents the level of reaction to the test which was recorded by the lab. [ < ] means that the value was the lowest reaction that the lab can measure. [ > ] means that the value was the highest the lab could measure. These types of tests will supply you with an index or key to depict what range of numbers is attributed to a negative, equivocal or positive test. The higher the reaction, the more likely the test will turn out to be positive. A value of < 0.90 would be considered negative, 0.90 to 1.09 is equivocal and any value larger than 1.09 is considered a positive result. 

The range column identifies the values which determine if a test is negative, positive or equivocal. This will determine the range of values for each possible result. For example, if anything in the < 10 range is considered negative, then a test result of [ 5 ]  would be negative. If the results are equivocal or need further explanation, our healthcare professionals are happy to help you understand your results and next steps. 

If your results come back negative, but you are still experiencing symptoms, you should see a doctor or call our care counselors. With the help of a health care physician, the underlying cause of such symptoms can be discovered and proper treatment can be established. 

It is possible that couples testing can result in one partner receiving a positive result and the other a negative result. This can be due to low exposure to the STD/STI or the incubation period unique to each. The incubation period is the time frame between exposure and symptoms when the bacteria or virus is undetectable by lab tests. Due to this, it is important to be mindful of the incubation period of the particular illness which you are testing for and when to schedule your test. This will achieve the most accurate results. 

Men and women also have different levels of risk for transmission–depending on the illness. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), women are more at risk for contracting an STD in general. This is due to the thinner membrane and moist environment of the vagina, making it easier to breed infection. Meanwhile, the penis does not have such delicate membranes. However, over 80% of all the newly reported HIV cases within the US in 2017 were among men. This statistic is even higher for HIV cases that were transmitted via male-to-male sexual contact. For this reason, keeping the risks for your demographic in mind is a great way to remain proactive about sexual health.  

Some physicians may prescribe the medication for the ailment, despite negative test results. They may also recommend later testing to avoid the incubation period. This is especially true for infections such as chlamydia or gonorrhea that are easily treated but have serious consequences if ignored. For example, chlamydia and gonorrhea are the most common root-causes of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID can cause multiple complications including infertility and chronic pelvic pain. 

Glossary Of Terms

While we do our best to help you interpret our data, this information is just a guide. If you have any questions or need clarification, feel free to reach out to your healthcare provider or our care counselors.

Normal, Negative, Not Detected, Non-Reactive
An infection was not found.
Abnormal, Positive, Detected, Reactive
An infection was found.
Equivocal, Indeterminate
This result is not firmly positive but it’s not clearly negative.
<
Less than sign
>
Greater than sign
TNP
Test Not Processed. If you see this in your results, contact our support team so we can schedule a recollection free of charge.

STD Breakdown

How long have I had chlamydia?

Due to the asymptomatic nature of chlamydia, it can be hard to tell how long the infection has been present. Since this STI is often present without symptoms, many people are unaware that they have it and could pass the bacteria to others. For this reason, it is always recommended to undergo testing before each new relationship and to use protective measures such as condoms and dental dams.

How accurate is my chlamydia test?

To test for chlamydia, our labs use an Aptima nucleic acid amplification test. This test is highly sensitive, typically providing us with a high accuracy rate. However, if the test is taken too soon, this may result in a false-negative (when a test comes out negative, but it should have been positive). To increase the effectiveness of this test, it is recommended to wait 72 hours post-exposure before getting tested. This will give the bacteria enough time to pass its incubation period and show-up on our tests. If you think that you may have tested too soon, we recommend waiting a few months before re-testing.

My test result was equivocal. What does that mean?

An equivocal test result means that the data from the test was not conclusive enough to provide a definitive answer. If this should happen, re-testing is necessary to provide a concrete positive or negative conclusion. Getting in touch with your primary care physician is often a good idea to get feedback on your results. Many doctors prescribe the medication for the illness just in case.

Learn more about Chlamydia.

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of chlamydia.

How long have I had gonorrhea?

It is difficult to determine how long a person has been living with gonorrhea. This is due to the asymptomatic nature of the STI. More than often, the individual carrying the infection is unaware and can unintentionally pass it to their partners in this way. To remain knowledgeable about your sexual health and prevent contraction, we recommend getting tested before each new relationship and using preventative measures such as condoms. This will protect you and your partner’s sexual health in the long haul.

How accurate is my gonorrhea test?

Our gonorrhea tests are completed using an Aptima nucleic acid amplification test. This test is highly sensitive, typically providing us with a high accuracy rate. However, if the test is taken too soon, this may result in a false-negative (when a test comes out negative, but it should have been positive). To increase the effectiveness of this test, it is recommended to wait 72 hours post-exposure before getting tested. This will give the infection enough time to pass its incubation period and show-up on our tests. If you think that you may have tested too soon, we recommend waiting a few months before re-testing.

My test result was equivocal. What does that mean?

An equivocal test result means that the data from the test was not conclusive enough to provide a definitive answer. If this should happen, re-testing is necessary to provide a concrete positive or negative conclusion. Getting in touch with your primary care physician is often a good idea to get feedback on your results. Many doctors prescribe the medication for the illness just in case.

Learn more about Gonorrhea.

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of gonorrhea.

How long have I had hepatitis B and who gave it to me?

It is not possible to determine exactly how long someone has had hepatitis B or who transmitted the infection. The level of damage caused to the liver may be able to provide a rough estimate, but it is not exact. Like other STDs, individuals are often unaware for a substantial amount of time before they find out about the disease. To remain knowledgeable about your sexual health and prevent contraction, we recommend getting tested before each new relationship and using preventative measures such as condoms to protect your sexual health.

What is the next step if my test result is abnormal?

If your test comes back as abnormal, this means that your hepatitis B test is positive. In this circumstance, one of our healthcare physicians would make sure to contact you, inform you of the test results and what steps to take to improve your health. The healthcare physician may ask questions concerning your sexual activity, usage of needles and if you have been informed of this condition in the past.

How can I keep myself healthy with Hepatitis B?

There are a variety of different ways to improve your health while living with hepatitis B. While there is no cure for chronic hepatitis B, keeping in touch with your liver specialist, refraining from alcohol consumption and getting vaccinated for hepatitis A are all measures which can improve your health. Our healthcare specialists are happy to provide you with the necessary resources and direction to assist you as well.

Learn more about Hepatitis B.

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of hepatitis B.

How accurate are my hepatitis C blood test results?

To ensure the most accurate results as possible, our labs use a Hepatitis C Antibody test. This test is highly sensitive, typically providing us with a high accuracy rate. However, if the test is taken too soon, this may result in a false-negative (when a test comes out negative, but it should have been positive). To increase the effectiveness of this test, it is recommended to wait 4 to 6 weeks post-exposure before getting tested. This will give the infection enough time to pass its incubation period and show-up on our tests. False-positives are also possible if you have had hepatitis C in the past, but no longer have it. This is because the antibodies to hepatitis C remain present in the body even after the infection is gone. To determine if a result is a false positive, further testing is recommended.

What is the next step if my test result is abnormal?

If your test comes back as abnormal, this usually means that you have come into contact with hepatitis C–but does not necessarily mean that the test is positive. Since the hepatitis C antibodies remain in the body after the infection is gone, basic tests can result in false-positives. Our healthcare providers can direct you to the proper specialist for further testing. This more sophisticated screening utilizes a Hepatitis C RNA PCR test to eliminate the possibility of a false-positive. If these tests come back negative, you do not have hepatitis C. If they come back positive, our healthcare specialist will make sure to update you on future treatment and how to stay healthy.

How can I keep myself healthy with Hepatitis C?

According to the CDC, there are two types of hepatitis C including acute (short-term) and chronic (life-long). Anyone with this diagnosis should avoid alcohol and visit a hepatologist for instructions on how to keep their liver healthy. Acute hepatitis C often does not require medication and can be taken care of naturally by our immune systems, unless otherwise specified by a doctor or if it develops into chronic hepatitis C. Individuals with a life-long diagnosis are prescribed oral medication and may even be cured.

Learn more about Hepatitis C.

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of hepatitis C.

How do I interpret my results?

For our HSV 1/2 testing, we supply our results in the form of a range instead of a regular positive or negative. Anything marked over 1.09 is considered high or positive, 0.9-1.09 is indeterminate and anything under 0.9 is negative. This may seem a little confusing at first but our care counselors are happy to help you understand your results.

How accurate are my results?

Our HSV 1/2 tests are completed using an IgG test to search for the presence of specific antibodies. This test is highly sensitive, typically providing us with a high accuracy rate. However, if the test is taken too soon, this may result in a false-negative (when a test comes out negative, but it should have been positive). To increase the effectiveness of this test, it is recommended to wait 4 to 6 weeks post-exposure before getting tested. This will give the virus enough time to pass its incubation period and show-up on our tests. If you think that you may have tested too soon, we recommend waiting a few months before re-testing.

Should I get re-tested?

There are only a couple reasons why we would recommend getting re-tested. For example, if your test came back as a false-negative due to early testing or if you might have acquired an additional form of HSV–we would recommend getting re-tested to stay up-to-date on your sexual health.

What does indeterminate mean?

Indeterminate is a result that means the infection is recent and not enough time has passed for the antibody count to reach its full level. However there is a possibility that you may have a naturally elevated IgG level.

Am I always contagious for HSV?

Individuals living with HSV always have a certain amount of risk, but this should not impede your everyday life. The herpes virus is spread via skin-to-skin contact with the infected area. This does not include regular contact such as hugging, shaking hands or sharing drinks. Generally, caution is advised during intercourse and kissing–especially during outbreaks when the virus is at its highest activity. Other than that, a herpes diagnosis should not weigh too much on your mind.

What is the difference between HSV-1 and HSV-2?

Generally, HSV-1 and HSV-2 are separated by their severity and where they are usually located on the body. HSV-1 is typically the common cold sore; however, it is possible to have HSV-1 in the genital area, although it is not common. Over half of most adults test positive for HSV-1.
HSV-2 is typically found on the genitals and known for having more severe symptoms. This type of herpes is less common, appearing in a little over 10% of the world’s population. HSV-2 also plays a role in increasing the risk of contracting HIV as well.

What are my next steps?

We always recommend consulting with your physician to establish the next steps to stay healthy. While there is no cure for HSV, a healthcare physician can prescribe antiviral medication to treat the symptoms and help prevent/mediate future outbreaks.

Learn more about HSV

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of HSV.

How long have I had HIV?

People can go years while living with HIV and be none the wiser. STDs are largely asymptomatic and often don’t have signs. Due to this, it is not possible to tell exactly how long you have been infected. However, our healthcare physicians can assess which stage of HIV you are currently in and how to prevent the virus from progressing further.

How accurate are my HIV antibody test results?

Our HIV tests are completed using the 4th generation HIV-1/2 Antigen and Antibodies test. This test is sensitive, typically providing us with a high accuracy rate. However, if the test is taken too soon, this may result in a false-negative (when a test comes out negative, but it should have been positive). To increase the effectiveness of this test, it is recommended to wait around 4 to 6 weeks post-exposure before getting tested. For HIV, the antigens are active at 4 weeks, while the antibodies are active at 6 weeks. Waiting this period of time will increase the accuracy of our tests.

How accurate are my HIV-1 RNA results?

We also offer an early detection test for HIV called an Aptima HIV-RNA Qualitative Assay. This test retrieves accurate results earlier than the typical test. This HIV RNA test is reserved for recent exposures and highly sensitive. To take advantage of this early detection, we recommend taking this test 10 full days after contact. This early detection test can be taken up to 4 weeks post-exposure. We recommend ordering the 4th generation HIV testing if these 4 weeks have already passed. The 4th generation testing offers accurate testing after the 4 week period, at a more cost-effective price.

What are the next steps if my results are abnormal?

If your test comes back as abnormal, our healthcare providers can direct you to the proper specialist for further testing. This extra testing is to eliminate the possibility of a false-positive. If further testing comes back positive, our healthcare specialist will make sure to update you on future treatment and how to stay healthy.

Learn more about HIV.

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of HIV.

How accurate are my syphilis results?

Our HIV tests are completed using Rapid Plasmin Reagin Testing (RPR). This test is highly sensitive, typically providing us with a high accuracy rate. However, if the test is taken too soon, this may result in a false-negative (when a test comes out negative, but it should have been positive). To increase the effectiveness of this test, it is recommended to wait 4 to 6 weeks post-exposure before receiving an RPR test, unless you begin to experience symptoms sooner. This will give the infection enough time to pass its incubation period and show-up on our tests.

Syphilis testing can also bring about a false-positive if the individual has pre-existing conditions such as leprosy, pregnancy and brucellosis. To ensure the accuracy of your results, titer and Treponema Pallidum Antibody (TPPA) reflex tests can investigate a potential false-positive. A titer test is represented by ratios. The higher the ratio, the more likely you are to be positive for syphilis. On the other hand, TPPA test results are shown as either a positive or negative result.

Why is my test positive if I’ve been cured of syphilis?

Syphilis testing is unique in the sense that once you have been infected, there will always be a certain amount of reaction to RPR testing–even if you no longer have it. Further confirmation testing will need to be compared with previous results to determine reinfection. If titer testing results in higher than normal ratios and your TPPA test is positive, re-exposure is possible.

What is the next step if my RPR and reflex test results are abnormal?

If your RPR test comes back as abnormal and so does your reflex tests, then our healthcare providers can discuss steps for treatment. Medication to treat and cure syphilis can be acquired by prescription from a healthcare provider.

My RPR is positive but my reflex tests are negative. What does this mean?

In the case that your RPR was positive, if the titer ratio is low and the TPPA test is negative, you do not have syphilis. The role of these reflex tests are to act as a double-check for the RPR result to avoid a false-positive. These reflex tests will be the determining factor for diagnosis.

Learn more about Syphilis.

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of syphilis.

How long have I had trichomoniasis?

It is difficult to determine how long a person has been living with trichomoniasis. This is due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease. More than often, the individual carrying the disease is unaware and can unintentionally pass it to their partners in this way. To remain knowledgeable about your sexual health and prevent contraction, we recommend getting tested before each new relationship and using preventative measures such as condoms. This will protect you and your partner’s sexual health in the long haul.

How accurate is my trichomoniasis test?

Our trichomoniasis tests are completed using an Aptima nucleic acid amplification test. This test is highly sensitive, typically providing us with a high accuracy rate. However, if the test is taken too soon, this may result in a false-negative (when a test comes out negative, but it should have been positive). To increase the effectiveness of this test, it is recommended to wait 72 hours post-exposure before getting tested. This will give the disease enough time to pass its incubation period and show-up on our tests. If you think that you may have tested too soon, we recommend waiting a few months before re-testing.

My test result was equivocal. What does that mean?

An equivocal test result means that the data from the test was not conclusive enough to provide a definitive answer. If this should happen, re-testing is necessary to provide a concrete positive or negative conclusion. Getting in touch with your primary care physician is often a good idea to get feedback on your results. Many doctors prescribe the medication for the illness just in case.

Learn more about trichomoniasis.

Learn more about the symptoms, complications and testing of trichomoniasis.